Articles

DRAWING OUT YOUR CLIENTS’ EXPERTISE ON THEMSELVES

A top-down approach

Coaches using top-down approaches start with a model of pre-established generalities, to which a client is compared. This might mean referring to a list of categories to which the client is matched. These categories then suggest appropriate ways to work with the client. Examples would be Enneagrams and the Meyers-Briggs Inventory. 

 While some practitioners adhere to their chosen framework without deviance, others use the frameworks to inform, but not dictate, what they do. In either case, a top-down approach inevitably involves applying some assumptions. If your framework has only square boxes, you will probably be looking for and asking about only what is in those square boxes. You risk missing entirely what’s outside the boxes, especially if your client isn’t consciously aware of it

 A bottom-up approach

Grove believed that to help a client learn about and help himself, he is best off working from the bottom up, that is, starting from scratch. No predetermined boxes. The facilitator encourages the client to expand his self-awareness by helping him find fundamental truths: Who am I? What do I know? What do I want? What needs to change for me to get what I want? These are broad, generic questions that provide no implicit answers.

 David Grove determined to make as few assumptions as possible in the way he worked. His guiding intention was to work with the client’s own content only, trusting that the client would find for himself what he needs.

Read more

Excerpt from Gina’s Panning for your Client’s Gold

HOW THE SCIENCE OF EMERGENCE CAN HELP YOU COACH

By Gina Campbell

According to the principles of emergence, when people with a less-than-optimal way of managing in the world collect enough pieces of information relating to the way they function, eventually a tipping point is reached, and they will structure for themselves a better way of managing. This new organization leads them to discover new ways of coping that can, in turn, mean new choices and outcomes are possible.

Read more

Excerpt from Gina’s Panning for Your Client’s Gold

Compliments: The other side of the judgment coin

By Gina Campbell

If you participate in a personal growth group or run one yourself, you probably have no problem with a common rule that no one criticizes participants as they share their experiences or feelings. Consider adding the rule that no compliments be paid either, for they are merely the other side of the same coin. 

Read more

Four ways to grow as a coach

By Diana Thomas

Over the last two years, I’ve been on a professional—and personal—journey from corporate executive to executive coach. Friends and colleagues often ask what I’ve learned during this time, and the truth is that I’ve learned a whole lot! Here are some of my biggest takeaways that have helped me to grow and improve as a coach.

Read more

How might a business coach use a client's metaphors?

By Gina Campbell

Many business and life coaches use Clean Language to help their clients get clear on what they want and need, to explore consequences of possible actions, to work on personal issues that are impacting their work, to enhance their leadership skills, to plan for the future, and more!

Read more

Just how free are we to choose?

By Gina Campbell

We all make choices every day; we gather information, assess our options, and come to logical decisions about our choices. Or do we?

Read more

Metaphors for tough financial times

By Gina Campbell

In today’s difficult economic times, many people are stressed out about their circumstances. If you are a helping professional working with struggling or anxious clients, you’ll be glad to learn that metaphors can help. Wondering how that could be, when jobs are in jeopardy and bills need to be paid now?

Read more

The edge effect in metaphor landscapes

By Gina Campbell

It is in those moments on a metaphoric bank—just before a client wades into a river, or goes through a gate, or leaps onto a boat—when the client faces some significant, even transformative, change. Here on the threshold, the client may know things not only about the two worlds, the one behind and the one ahead, but also about things which are found in neither world and are crucial for staying a new course.

Read more

Transitioning from executive leader to executive coach

By Diana Thomas

For the past two years I’ve been on a marvelous journey—moving from being a successful vice president for a Fortune 100 company to becoming a successful executive coach. I am now well on my way to fulfilling a lifelong dream of having my own business, and helping great people become even better while also finding more happiness and satisfaction in their professional and personal lives.  

Having recently completed a six-month extensive coach training program, I wanted to share my story so that you might benefit from some of the insights I’ve gained during my journey… thus far.

Read more